HOPE, ILLUSION AND IMAGINATION: THE POLITICS OF PAROLE AND REENTRY IN THE ERA OF MASS INCARCERATION

Kathy Boudin¥

I. Looking Backward and Not Forgetting

There is a traditional saying when you leave prison, “Leave your shoes but don’t look back.” How could I not look back as I walked down the path to the security building, after being in prison for twenty-two years? I could see the hands of women waving, pressed up against windows divided by bars and chicken wire. I, myself, had done this for many year—watching, and holding my breath. This time I was leaving, I walked through one door of the security kiosk as a prisoner, and only minutes later I came out of another door a free person. I turned around and waved, taking a long look to hold on to my friends, and then I left. And they were left there.

THE THIRTEENTH AMENDMENT AND CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE

William M. Carter, Jr.¥

Thank you all for having me here to join in this celebration of Professor Bell’s life and legacy. I’d like to offer my sincere thanks to the University, President Sexton, Dean Morrison, Vice Dean Hertz, Mrs. Bell, the entire Bell family, and all of the family and friends who have joined here for this Lecture, which I hope will prove worthy of Professor Bell’s legacy. I’m quite honored to be here at NYU. I’ve long been an admirer of NYU—both the university and the law school—for its deep commitment to both teaching and scholarship as well as the justified reputation of this law school as being committed to public interest, public service, and social justice.

PREVENTIVE LAW: INTERDISCIPLINARY LESSONS FROM MEDICAL–LEGAL PARTNERSHIP

Mallory Curran

The following is an edited and footnoted transcript of the keynote address of the 2013 Review of Law and Social Change Annual Alumni Reception. The lecture was delivered at New York University School of Law on April 17, 2013. Ms. Curran was invited to deliver the address in recognition of her pioneering role in the medical–legal partnership movement and her demonstrated commitment to the values of the Review of Law and Social Change. By describing real-life stories of individual clients and successful advocacy efforts, Ms. Curran illustrated medical–legal partnership’s unique ability to improve community health on the front lines of the delivery of healthcare and where policy decisions impacting health are made. Applying the lessons learned from her career to the broader public interest law community, Ms. Curran encouraged the audience to embrace opportunities for interdisciplinary partnership and to seek out opportunities to practice preventive law.

ONE ADVOCATE’S ROAD MAP TO A CIVIL RIGHTS LAW FOR THE NEXT HALF CENTURY: LESSONS FROM THE LATINO CIVIL RIGHTS EXPERIENCE

2013 LATINOS AND THE LAW LECTURE, OCTOBER 22, 2013

Thomas A. Saenz¥

The following is an edited and footnoted transcript of the 2013 Latinos and the Law Lecture, sponsored by the Bickel & Brewer Latino Institute for Human Rights. The lecture was delivered at New York University School of Law on October 22, 2013.[1] Through a review of some of the significant cases that MALDEF has undertaken in recent years and of the historical experience of the Latino community in the legal system, the lecture seeks support for an expanded notion of what constitutes “civil rights law” grounded in the Latino civil rights experience.[2]

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 57 other followers